reddening west – deltas

– featured image courtesy of nicola gell –

the diligence of reddening west cannot be overstated.  the austin-based quartet has toiled for the past couple of years over their self-released debut full-length, deltas, its vibrant swaths of americana a sprawling, existential treatise on the inherently transitory nature of life, honing a particularly fastidious approach to their songwriting and cinematic arrangements in the process.

anchored by the lead single, “even if” and its opening number, “marjorie,” deltas finds reddening west picking right up where their 2016 extended play, where we started, left off, with spacious vistas punctuated by niamh fahey’s swooning fiddle textures and matt evans’ soaring vocal melodies.  on the early standout “holding hours,” evans paints a bucolic backdrop for his pondering, with syncopated guitar lines and back-beats rolled together, in search of an apex never quite discovered.  “different now” finds evans waist-deep in reverb, again weaving observations of personal change through pristine turns of phrase and beautiful imagery.

the majesty of deltas is contained in its sweeping gestures as much as it is in its most minute intricacies; the palate-cleansing instrumental “inverness” is doused in nuance and contrapuntal wonders, a perfect segue to the album’s extended third act.  the penultimate cut “diffuse” is especially affecting and tender, its propulsive nature the perfect foil for the album’s finale, “late summer grass,” itself a vivid and measured punctuation mark on reddening west’s rich, slow-burning debut.  full of nooks and crannies ripe for exploration and vast canyons of elegiac introspection, deltas is a perfect autumnal vessel, a fine companion for changing times.

deltas is out tomorrow, available via reddening west’s bandcamp page, but you can experience it in its entirety a bit early right here on the dimestore.  tuck in below.

 

premiere – reddening west

– featured image courtesy of nicola gell – 

a well-received debut project can be both reaffirming and a motivating tool to expand on its most resonant features.  the austin quartet reddening west latched onto this philosophy, using the framework of their 2016 extended play where we started as a reference point as they meticulously crafted their saturated, sprawling debut full-length, deltas, an intimate album preoccupied with existential thoughts on transition and change.

matt evans wrestles with the aforementioned themes throughout “even if,” the first preview of deltas, a reflective narrative couched in hesitation, reservation, and self-doubt.  enveloping evans’ sometimes-desolate imagery is the bucolic warmth so recognizable in reddening west’s arrangements.  a loose, organic heartbeat is a comfortable foundation for niamh fahy’s cinematic string counter-melodies, an affecting punctuation to the track’s lyrical sentiments.

taken as a cohesive unit, “even if” is a sonic embodiment of the wide-open vistas the mind’s eye occupies in a contemplative state such as this, a powerful rumination on complacency and vigilance indicative of reddening west’s slow-burn approach to songwriting.

deltas arrives september 21st; it is currently available for pre-order and can be pre-saved on spotify.  its lead single, “even if,” premieres today on the dimestore.  listen in below.

premiere – reddening west

reddening west
photo courtesy of the artist

buried just beneath the bucolic overcoat of reddening west is an honest, heartbreaking thread of immediacy.  the austin trio will release their debut effort, a gorgeous collection of lovelorn folk songs entitled where we started, on march 4th; today we’re premiering the ep’s second track, “golden light.”

quaint fingerpicking reflects the song’s initial imagery, but “golden light” gradually becomes more melancholic, refracting its namesake as pianos and percussion slip into the texture.  vocalist matt evans doubles down on that tone even after his auxiliary accompaniment fades into the background, delivering a brief, parting lyric that skirts satisfying resolution in favor of a different kind of finality that feels all too familiar.  take a listen to “golden light” below.