pillar point – “dove”

pllr pnt
photo courtesy of the artist

pillar point’s sophomore full-length marble mouth is already among this year’s stand-out bodies of work, with scott reitherman fastidiously doubling down on his dark yet invigorating brand of dance music.  one of the album’s sturdiest singles, “dove,” was recently tapped by director jacob krupnik to use in a vogue-centric music video that follows kia labeija through the streets of bogotá, colombia in pursuit of an elusive lover.  the video premiered on the creators project earlier this week; navigate there to read more about the project’s history and then watch the clip for “dove” below.

pillar point – “strange brush”

pillar point
photo courtesy of megumi shauna arai

the advent of scott reitherman’s second full-length as pillar point, marble mouth, has been prefaced by two excellent singles that double down on the dark, brooding aesthetic that peppered his self-titled debut.  add “strange brush” to that list.  the album’s third single completes a trifecta established by “part time love” and perpetuated by “dove,” but this time, reitherman leans on a pulsing krautrock groove and a mournful, descending vocal melody to convey his message.  what’s truly special is the organic piano motif that somehow blossoms from the depths of the song’s texture.  dive into “strange brush” below.

 

 

pillar point – “dove”

pillar point
photo courtesy of megumi shauna arai

scott reitherman is slated to release his sophomore full-length as pillar point, marble mouth, on january 22nd via polyvinyl records.  after sharing the album’s brooding lead single,”part time love,” in late october, reitherman has deposited a second offering to digest before the year’s end.  “dove” is every bit as haunting yet cathartic as its predecessor, with dizzying arpeggiated cellos and a resolute drum beat pulsating through an eerie vocal sample of the song’s title.  its lyrics feel cleansing and therapeutic as well, perhaps a preview of thematics reitherman will suss out across the album’s duration.  check out “dove” below.

listen to a new song from pillar point

pillar point
photo courtesy of megumi shauna arai

scott reitherman’s self-titled debut effort as pillar point was one of the more captivating releases of early 2014, capable of sating even the most voracious of synth-pop appetites.  now reitherman is back for round two; pillar point’s sophomore album, marble mouth, drops january 22nd via polyvinyl records.  its pulsating lead single, “part time love,” premiered on stereogum yesterday and showcases an astute, full-blown execution of the darker dance passages reitherman flirted with throughout his debut.  the track is the first of an album’s worth of collaboration with of montreal’s kevin barnes, who produced marble mouth at his studio in athens, georgia.  take a listen to “part time love” below.

watch the music video for pillar point’s “dreamin'”

i’m exhausted after a three-day wind symphony tour, but there was nothing more relaxing than coming home to pillar point’s brand new music video for “dreamin’.”  the video features an extended introduction to the song before a slow-motion dance takes over, perfectly complementing the aesthetic defined by pillar point.  true visual art like this is a rarity in the realm of music videos; take the time to check this one out.

pillar point – pillar point

pillarpoint-digitalcoverelectro-pop has become a polarizing genre; with a plethora of artists constantly tapping into the popular aesthetic, it’s just as likely for a project to be unceremoniously passed over as it is to be critically acclaimed.  scott reitherman took this risk when he shelved his indie project, throw me the statue, to focus on writing new music as pillar point.  two years of hard work and a relocation back to seattle paid off; pillar point’s self-titled debut album contains a collection of songs that meticulously explore all the nuances of synth-driven pop music.

a taste of pillar point’s dynamic and emotive capabilities was given last summer, in the form of a 7″ single containing “diamond mine” and “dreamin’.”  the single’s a-side would wind up being the lead-off track on the album, with its vintage synthesizers and distorted bass lines working in tandem towards slight reckless abandon.  “diamond mine” announces the presence of pillar point and showcases one facet of the project, but the album really begins to open up with “cherry.”  the third track follows an energetic one-two punch, bolstered by the excellent “eyeballs,” and is comparatively subdued, even slightly sinister in tone.  it’s here that reitherman’s lyrics finally reflect his music; they’re melancholy, but still contain substantial forward momentum created through narrative.

these two established components of pillar point’s aesthetic function as a metaphorical double-helix from this point forward; songs like “black hole” and “touch” are powered by insistent dance hooks that polarize their yearning and even downright sad lyrics, while slower jams like “strangers in paradise” and the aforementioned “dreamin'” place more of an emphasis on the somber words and their delivery.  pillar point was born out of substantial personal turmoil which is unabashedly presented across this album, but reitherman is savvy enough to masquerade behind less depressing sounds akin to lcd soundsystem and washed out.  with a groove that changes in tempo but never ceases to exist, a danceable backbone is built into the record that makes sure the listener never has the opportunity to become too depressed.

pillar point is a rare gift to the synth-pop world.  by blending his knowledge of pop songwriting with an affinity for darker electronic music like suicide, reitherman has created a product that truly stands out.  if you’re not immediately smitten by the analog synthesizers, the combination of pulsating beats and reitherman’s ethereal voice is sure to win you over.  a nine-song track list seems almost criminal, but there’s more than enough depth and emotion to unpack and digest.  pillar point is out via polyvinyl records on february 25th.  don’t miss out on this one.

8.6/10