premiere – why bonnie

– featured image courtesy of jen lee rachid – 

austin’s why bonnie started 2018 off well with their intimate, inimitable in water extended play, a four-track collection that has propelled the band towards a new set of tunes due out later this summer.  nightgown is an apt title for these cozy bedroom pop songs that feel like they were all written around twilight, and perhaps none embody this description more closely than the release’s centerpiece, “stereo.”

“stereo” avoids the grandiose tendencies of a traditional break-up song by instead honing in on the staggering vulnerability that pervades the moments immediately following a break-up, parsing every emotion with excruciating care.  “looking at you through my screen and you’re smiling back at me / you’re stuck in a silent movie but to me you seem so real” sings blair howerton, her alto lilting as normalcy’s disappearance becomes apparent.  bolstered by organ swells and swooning, reverb-drenched guitars, “stereo” gradually builds to crescendo, its inherent haze suited for introspective summer evenings.

nightgown is out june 20th via sports day records.  its first single, “stereo,” premieres right here on the dimestore; listen in below.

why bonnie – “practice”

– featured image courtesy of the artist – 

austin upstarts why bonnie are eyeing the release of their debut extended play, in water, due next friday via the wonderful sports day records.  after announcing their arrival with the propulsive jaunt “made of paper,” the texas quartet deftly switch gears on a new single, “practice.”

“practice” stakes its claim on a collective mid-tempo ostinato, one that allows vocalist blair howerton ample ground to develop her narrative and follows her lead as she shifts into the track’s mantra: “the rest is practice / it’s not the real thing.”  after appearing to wrap up just past the two-minute mark, “practice” blossoms into a gorgeous coda saturated with extra textures to make its resolution that much more triumphant.

why bonnie will drop their four-track effort in full on february 16th.  disappear into “practice” below.

why bonnie – “made of paper”

– featured image courtesy of the artist –

austin-based relative newcomers why bonnie are slated to release their debut extended play, in water, february 16th via sports day records.  a glimpse of the succinct, promising four-song collection comes in the form of “made of paper,” a three-minute indie-pop jaunt that finds vocalist blair howerton ruminating over a coursing bass line and angular, ascending guitar riffs.

it’s an indelible earworm packed full of relatable nostalgia, a potent cocktail that leaves a lasting impression.  take a listen to “made of paper” below.

harley alexander – “tiny bricks”

– featured image courtesy of the artist –

little more than a year after releasing harland, the montreal-based singer-songwriter harley alexander is gearing up for the advent of a new mini-album, spill kid.  alexander leads somewhat of a nomadic lifestyle, splitting his time between performing in montreal and planting trees clear across the country, just outside of vancouver.  it was on the west coast that this latest batch of songs took shape; nestled in amongst nurturing tape hiss and warm acoustic guitars are slightly poignant ruminations on alexander’s surroundings.

“tiny bricks,” the first offering from alexander’s forthcoming release, studiously evokes every facet of this aesthetic.  inside a simple structure of drum programming and softly-strummed chords lies a hazy narrative, one that examines the soothing familiarity of nature as it relates to a smattering of interpersonal vulnerability.  punctuated by a mournful melodic motif that sustains throughout its coda, “tiny bricks” is an excellent glimpse into the intimate environment that is spill kid.

spill kid arrives october 20th via sports day records.  marinate in “tiny bricks” below.

harley alexander – “staring at photographs”

– featured image courtesy of the artist – 

harley alexander’s retreat from halifax to a remote cabin in quebec has yielded harland, an eight-song collection of woozy, wandering bedroom pop that’s due out next friday via sports day records.  framing the album’s aesthetic is “staring at photographs,” its breezy, clave-like chord progression bolstered by saturday-afternoon guitar noodling and alexander’s surprisingly commanding voice, flipping between his natural register and a reedy falsetto with incredible ease and immediacy.

“staring at photographs,” like much of harland, recalls a home recording taped off of a transistor radio: warm and unassuming, its edges carefully smoothed and rounded.  alexander’s awareness of such a nostalgic manipulation extends into his lyrics, as he comes to grips with the fact that an idyllic snapshot from the past often belies the true nature of a present-day relationship.  it’s an uncomfortable reality housed in a comforting vessel, a gentle hand that guides towards realization.  take a listen to “staring at photographs” below.